Veggies and Brown Rice

I love recipes, I do.

I spend a ridiculous amount of time surfing vegan and Paleo food blogs as well as browsing cookbooks. Saving whole plant food ideas on Pinterest is a hobby level occupation. Even before making a drastic change to my diet, I loved watching Good Eats or reading recipes. Food is essential. Cooking is a basic life skill worth mastering and, if you can, enjoying.

Yet a large percentage of our meals aren’t elaborate. A large part of our diet success is how the limitations (especially the no salt, no oil, no sugar directive which is so important) make restaurants and prepared foods off limits. It’s also made for culinary streamlining. I seldom cook one meal’s worth of food. More dishes are 2 – 4 ingredients than anything. Easy to prepare, inexpensive and good as leftovers is the trifecta for getting in the rotation.

Yesterday’s midday “breakfast” is pictures above. At this point while still working to lose weight, we don’t typically eat in the morning. I’ve joked calling it “fasting” makes it sound better than talking about not eating until later in the day or allowing yourself to become hungry because that’s when the body burns stored calories.

At first, I was avoiding too many whole grains and potatoes, but I have not observed any adverse impact on the scale when I partake. Brown rice has quickly become a staple. At just over 200 calories a cup and with tons of filling fiber, if anything, it keeps me satisfied. We’ve also found that Chris is able to avoid gout flair ups with eating grains and potatoes.

This particular brown rice was seasoned with garlic powder at the ratio of one teaspoon per cup of uncooked rice and cook to the directions on the package. Brown rice takes a bit longer – 45 minutes instead of 30 – to cook than white but otherwise it’s the same method. It’s flavorful enough to be interesting but plain enough to pair with any other dish or add another flavoring on the table. Sometimes I do plain or add ginger as well as garlic. My serving got a hit of Tabasco before I got down to eating.

The veggie mix is Costco’s frozen stir fry blend, plus a pound bag of Costco frozen broccoli. I never think there is enough broccoli. I think we pay around $7 for the four pound bags and it’s great quality stuff. Yes, there is a difference. Buy yourself a cheap bag of store brand frozen broccoli and enjoy all those weird end pieces that are more white than green and I’ll be over here with my bright green tiny trees.

One thing I always get questions about our diet is how can you cook things without oil? I admit, it seems weird when nearly every recipe starts with oil or butter in a pan. Granted, it adds flavor and sometimes adds to the texture of a finished dish, but it’s not required. I start with a little water in the bottom of my pan for things like cooking aromatics or this vegetable blend. I’ve also used vinegar to add some moisture to the pan for things like onions and mushrooms.

In this case, I added the coconut vinegar to the pan once everything was thawed and well on it’s way to done. It’s a mild one and brings a little flavor the the party. We got the vinegar as well as several other flavors (the spicy one is wildly popular in our house) at Saigon Market of Greenville. Watch the labels because some will have salt or excess sugar, but otherwise vinegar is your friend.

A giant pile of veggies, including green peas and string beans which are legumes, and whole grain rice is a nutritionally sound meal. Ready in under an hour. Eating healthy is *so* hard.

Happy eating!

Author: Tina Louise

Nerd. Geek. Dork.

2 thoughts on “Veggies and Brown Rice”

  1. I would have never thought of using the coconut vinegar to cook with! I’m going to have to see if my local stores carry it. Also see you are in SC. My family is from Darlington and Hartsville! Good to see someone else in SC / from SC trying to do this!!!!

    1. It’s certainly not a normal part of SC food culture. *laugh*

      Flavored vinegar has been a huge help. We have a cool place in Greenville Oil & Vinegar with fancy flavored vinegar, some so sweet you can put a little in bubbly water for a soda. The Asian market options are cheaper, of course, but watch for sodium content.

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